Committed to PEOPLE'S RIGHT TO KNOW
Vol. 5 Num 347 Fri. May 20, 2005  
   
Culture


Sweety: Making it big on the small screen


Tanvin Sweety is a young police officer, who means business. She has made it a point to punish the local miscreants, who get away with committing heinous crimes in broad daylight. She tends to give them a taste of their own medicine by serving them up with a 'good old fashioned bashing'.

This is the role, Sweety is portraying in the on-going drama serial The New Shabuj Opera.

When director Mamun ur Rashid cast Sweety for the role, she was quite uncertain whether she could do it. But after she was dressed up as an ASP, the director said, "You must do justice to the character with a bold performance." So, to make the performance realistic, Sweety literally beat up the actors who played the villainous roles. This beating up led to a month-long pain on the hoodlum's shoulder and a severe injury on a co-star's back.

Starting as a ramp model, Sweety became popular for her attractive appearance in television commercials that included cosmetics, boutiques, milk powder to detergent and electric cables. Sweety has acted in about 100 television plays including Shundari, Rupali Nadir Dheu, Haraner Nat Jamai, Jol Porey Pata Norey and Pothey Pothey Choltey Choltey. She played diverse roles ranging from an indigenous helpless widow, a fashionable teen, and a vindictive victim of the Liberation War to an ordinary deprived housewife.

As a theatre activist, Sweety proudly states that she had performed in some quality stage plays that are considered as milestones in the theatre history of Bangladesh such as Payer Awaj Pawa Jay, Ekhono Kritodash, Meraj Fakirer Ma and Meherjan.

About her absence in commercials, Sweety says, "If I want to perform with dedication, I must concentrate on a single media. So, I have decided to act in plays with commitment."

Dismayed at the present theatre scenario, Sweety says, "The increasing number of television channels has led to a decrease in the number of theatre-goers. Some new stages are being built in inconvenient venues where the majority of the audience are reluctant to go."

When asked about obscenity in ramp modelling, Sweety retorted, "When we used to walk the ramp, we never experienced any thing objectionable. Models need to have greater commitment. We don't necessarily have to imitate the western format blindly. However, we can always blend the best of east and west."

Picture
Tanvin Sweety in the role of a police officer (C) as Fazlur Rahman Babu looks on (R)