Home   |  Issues  |  The Daily Star Home | Volume 1, Issue 16, Tuesday Septembert 16, 2003

 

 

 

 

 

Shop special

Rupanzel- Introducing New
Era's Herbal Products

Wara Karim

Let's go back to nature! Natural products are in vogue today. From clothes, home accessories to beauty care products; all those manufactured from natural ingredients are winning the race of fashion and style.
Women are taking greater care of their face, hair and body today and herbal products are coming forward to compete with chemical-rich commodities, which are often injurious to our very sensitive skin.

Parveen Sultana Huq started her Rupanzel Home Industries back in January 2001 from the solid drive to cater herbal beauty care products to the women of Bangladesh. While residing in New York she witnessed the craze for natural beauty care products among American girls and women, how herbal products worth hundreds of dollars were instantaneously sold over the counter. It was this off-track production, which inspired her to start a home industry back in Bangladesh that would manufacture beauty products made directly from natural ingredients.

Today, Rupanzel produces a wide range of products ranging from herbal face pack, face wash, henna conditioner to herbal hair oil and skin toner. The distinctive feature of all these products is that they are produced from 100 percent natural components, thereby the application of these products allows no negative side effects and that they are absolutely chemical-free. Mrs. Parveen completed a 6-month-long course on herbal beauty care from Astoria Japanese vs. US Herbal Institute, New York. After returning to Dhaka she started her mission by introducing a herbal hair oil, which soon began to sell like hot cakes. She gradually got interested in facial care products. Today, her products comprise a turmeric face wash (uptan) and a neem scrub, both of which prevent skin from bacteria, germs, skin allergies, aging, black and white heads, dirt and oil. Besides there is a herbal clove pack in her collection, especially suitable for skin that undergo frequent pimple attacks, this clove pack promises to remove blemishes left by acne. Then there is mudpack, sandalwood pack and a henna conditioner. There is herbal hair oil and Vitamin E oil. You can use the herbal hair oil for hot oil treatment. Oil treatment with this herbal hair oil will gift you sound sleep at night, prevent untimely graying of hair and brittleness. Rupanzel also produces skin toners, which are rich in minerals and Vitamin E; these toners act as a make up remover, cleanser and a lotion at the same time. Mrs. Parveen's new category of products, which include herbal body oil, Aloe Vera lotion and petroleum jelly (in strawberry and orange flavors), are expected to grace the shelves of all the renowned stores of the capital very soon.

Rupanzel have exhibited their herbal beauty care products in the females' residential halls of Dhaka University, which include Rokeya Hall, Kuwait Moitry Hall, and Fazilatunnesa Hall. They have also presented their products in the Dhaka Medical College auditorium, Home Economics Hall, and won the hearts of hundreds of young women of this generation. Mrs. Parveen would leave for Washington D.C. in the middle of this October to take part in a International Trade Fair, which she is hoping, would earn her international recognition.

You can purchase these superb products at Nandan, Family Needs, PQS, 3S Shopping Mall, Rapa Plaza, Pick n Pay, Banglar Mela, Mayasir, Mela, Superfresh, Uttama, Lavender, New Market, Gausia, Mouchak Market, Prabartana, Mirpur Muktijodhha Market, beauty parlors like Saaj and Figurina and pharmacies like Lazz Pharma. In other words, these skin care products are accessible in almost every nook of Dhaka.

Herbs and spices like horitoki, neem leaves, neem oil, mehendi, shikakai, bohora, amloki, methi, brahmoni, trifola and numerous other natural extracts make her products matchless in the crowd of beauty care products which are rich in artificial constituents and contain alkali. Rupanzel is adding a new dimension to our industries manufacturing beauty care products. We hope Mrs. Parveen can continue to triumph in her success and also secure a status for Bangladeshi products in the international market. And all of you out there, if you haven't sampled these impressive products then give them a try as soon as you can.


Shop talk

Bedspreads
A beautiful bed sheet is a must to make your favorite room an ideal place for pleasurable moments. There are cotton bedspreads accompanied by two pillow covers now available at PQS, Uttara. They have a good collection of bedspreads accessible in diverse prints; so one of them is definitely waiting to match your taste. You can purchase these bed sheets for Tk.750 from this superstore.

Bags
These bags are lovely! PQS holds up a classy collection of totes manufactured from clothes, leather and other accessories. They are chic and are standing ready to go hand in hand with your outfits. Prices usually start from Tk.500 and mount as high as Tk.800 and above.

Tiny nail-clippers
They are so tiny that you can even stash one of these inside your wallet. Golden in color, these really midget nail-cutters are half the length and width of regular nail-clippers. They are utile yet small and easy to use. These are available for Tk.45 at PQS.

Bookmarks
For avid readers of books, it's often a hassle to keep track of reading. But don't worry, there are really cute leaf-shaped bookmarks now available at the Banani branch of Hallmark. You can get these bookmarks with your star sign embossed on top for Tk.15.

Cotton Buds
Fay has now introduced small packs of purified cotton buds for Tk.12. Each pack contains 50 sticks. They are so handy that you can use them for a number of purposes, from make up to first aid purpose. So stow them with your make up kits or in your domestic first-aid box.

Mala
Beads are in fad. The Uttara branch of PQS is, at the moment, retailing a wide collection of beaded malas. Obtainable in different shapes, patterns and hues, these accessories for neck are truly fashionable and are available at Tk.60.

By Wara Karim

 

 

 

Essentials

Tapping telephone calls
The government recently proposed an amendment to the Bangladesh Telecommunications Act, 2001, which allows intelligence agencies to tap telephone calls and intercept e-mails of individuals. If they are allowed to do so, it will be a gross violation of civil rights and will also be considered as an invasion into our privacy. What do they wish to accomplish by this measure anyway, as big brothers, politicians, and the government itself protect criminals in our country?

Giving immunity to US soldiers
Bangladesh government recently signed a pact with the United States under which no US soldiers and officers charged with criminal offences could be tried in Bangladesh. This also makes sure that if a US soldier or officer takes shelter in Bangladesh after committing an offence the Bangladesh government cannot hand that person over to the International Criminal Court for prosecution. If we want to try any US personnel, we would have to notify the US authority for consent. It brings some important questions in to our minds. Why are we giving immunity to US soldiers? What crimes might they have committed to need protection like this?

Meetings on the streets
Major parties very often hold political meetings blocking important streets, which disrupt free movement of traffic. We have to take alternative routes to reach our destinations, often having to go a long way out of our way. These blocks create severe traffic jams, which sometimes takes several hours to clear. All the parties claim that they are working for people's cause. Instead, they violate it. They need to come to their senses about this issue.

Destroying buses
It is a common practice amongst the supporters of our political parties to destroy public vehicles, the day before hartal, during hartal and whatever cause there might be. These are properties of the taxpayers. To ensure people's rights they destroy buses? Confusing, isn't it.

By Shahnaz Parveen

 

         

 
 

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