Home   |  Issues  |  The Daily Star Home | Volume 2, Issue 4, Tuesday, July 20, 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

diningdecor

ONE can let the imagination run free when designing a dining room. Whether one is to devote a full room for the purpose, or just a corner, there's scope for a lot of drama. While the focus is on food, diners should be given alternative visual interests on which to cast their gaze during leisurely repasts. These can range from collections to artwork to rainbow lighting.

A separate dining room is a luxury for many people. In apartments, town houses and in many modern homes, a section of the living room is the space for table and chairs, meaning that the style chosen for the main living area is carried over into the dining part of the room. Such is the case with the modern dining decor shown in the pictures, which shares its modernistic/metro style with an adjoining living area. The mahogany wooden table, fitted with Victorian wooden legs and Victorian styled wooden curved back chair are matched and the adjoining living room space is furnished in a similar style. The wall color also matches with other area. The off white colour scheme makes for a cool and calm atmosphere. The rustic tiles are set diagonally under the dining table. The floor graphics are surrounded by a 5" geometric border. So the deep and light shades of modern rustic tiles create a clean and healthy area. The false ceiling also highlights the area.

The traditional method of lighting dining rooms with a single chandelier poses problems: ordinarily, the light source has to be turned up so high that its glare overpowers the room, eclipsing everything in it. The solution is to add indirect lighting so that the chandelier casts a sparkling glow and creates the illusion of providing all the light for the room. Since the dining room table is occasionally used as a workspace as well as for entertainment, a good source of bright, indirect light is essential in any lighting plan for the dining room. Spotlights have a nice illuminative effect on the painting.

The effect of a green plant always creates a different mood in the other area. Additional big ficus plants at the corner of the room reinforces the area, while an up lighter behind the plants supplements the light from the chandelier.

Today in our busy lives, the refrigerators should be within easy reach, and thus it is important for them to be presentable. Designer arranged an elegant look stainless steel fridge in the dining area.

As the focus of the dining area is the table, table settings play a key role. With a bit of innovation and enthusiasm, we can make our table as interesting as the food we place on it. Expensive dinnerware does not necessarily fulfill a design plan. Effective lighting and the right crockery and cutlery can create a good mood for meal. Choosing the right tableware is a difficult but pleasurable job. Use individual colourful place mats and matches colourful crockery and cutlery. Today crockery comes in different shapes, sizes and colours that can be used effectively to decorate our dining table. We used a colourful soup set and different shapes of spoons to break the monotony. We can use decorative accessories like dried flowers, small table plants, colourful printed tablecloth, napkins holder and candles to brighten the table further. The soft, arm glow of candle light can create a magical atmosphere in an instant, to create a very special atmosphere candles can become the focal point of table setting. Slim, tall candles are perfect for elegant dining. White candles are the norm at formal occasions.

So, while we cannot change our dining table or wall colour or floor tiles everyday, we can rearrange our dining decor with a little ingenuity and imagination. Just move away from the conventional approach and get inventive.

Nazneen Haque Mimi
Interior consultant,
Journeyman
For further details contact email: journeym@citechco.net
Photo Credit: Hasan Saifuddin Chandan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 

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