Home   |  Issues  |  The Daily Star Home | Volume 3, Issue 32, Tuesday March 21, 2006

 

 

Banking Tips


Nasreen Sattar Head of International Sales, Standard Chartered Bank

 

Q. A firm having A & B as partners has a bank account that either partner can operate . A correspondence is received by the bank that Partner "A" has died. Will the bank honour cheques which were signed by A before his death but were presented after his demise?

On the death of a partner, the banker must stop paying from the partnership account specially to determine the liability of the deceased partner. The banker should not make payments of the cheques, which were earlier signed but presented after his demise.

Q. I have changed jobs and would like to advise the bank to send all my correspondence including my statements to my new address. Can I do this over telephone?

Any change of address has to be advised to the bank by means of a letter signed by the account holder/ authorised signatory. Banks normally do not take this kind of instruction over telephone.


Beauty Talk

Dear Sadia,
I have a number of problems. First I have coloured my hair at home and the colour on the top of my crown is really bright. It looks really horrible because the rest of the hair is really close to my natural hair colour. How can I fade out the colour? Please help. How can I take care of my coloured hair? I have been using epilator but I develop little rashes that fade away the next day. How can I stop this from happening? Are wonder bra strapless push ups available here? Desperate about the hair issue.

Ans1: You can get rid of the excess colour by applying brown dye only on the roots, its simple enough but do let the professionals do it this time.

Condition your hair regularly and use shampoos and other products, which are specifically made for coloured or chemically treated hair. They enhance the sheen of the hair as well as protect the colour, making if longer lasting. Use aloe vera gel to avoid any kind of rash.

To my knowledge push up's are not available here, but I did pass this place called 'Sweet Dreams' in Banani which carry lingerie, perhaps they might carry them or get them for you.


Under a different sky

By Iffat Nawaz

Gondhobichar

Among the thousand things I miss about Bangladesh, there are a few that I definitely don't miss. Stand still traffic jams with self appointed traffic controllers hitting every car and rickshaw, the difference between estimates and approximates and exacts about everyone's time sense, the narrow stairwell in Aziz Super Market, the forever “in progress” construction in streets and the smell of Bengali bazaars, not just any bazaars but the ones with meat, potatoes, fish and spinach, that smell of all scents mixed together with human sweat and bad breath. No I don't miss that at all.

Not that I went to the bazaar in Bangladesh, usually it was the job of someone else, older and wiser about ripe mangos and fresh hilshas, but I have ridden on rickshaws and cars through bazaars enough times to know the distinct smell of fresh and rotten fish mixed with the ones of seasonal fruits. Not very becoming.

There are millions of things that I wish could be transported from Bangladesh to America every second, fragments of memories buried behind, people, tunes, certain flowers and fuchka stalls, but most of them never make it across the abundant water and lands. But some things do make it across the oceans, and unfortunately the Bengali Bazaar with all its aromas is one of them.

Don't get me wrong, I am grateful to have Bengali grocery shops here in the States, without which I wouldn't be able to have my daily dosage of tamarind achar and ghee and occasional guavas, but these shops although placed in all American leasing spaces, smell all out Bengali (not in a good way). When you walk in, the smell of frozen fish and different spices mixed with bloody goat meats welcome you. The space is utilized (or should I say abused?) to the T, every corner holds something, let it be puffed rice and chanachur or mustard oil and rosogollas. You barely make it through the isles to see how the frozen parathas are right next to the frozen fish, all in the same freezer, touching each other like it's completely compatible and how the hair oils and ghee are mashed together in one corner, as if you can substitute each for the other; without care all is just crammed in giving off a bizarre smell that resembles no description of Chitra Divakurni's portrayal of Bengali grocery shops for the westerners in “Mistress of Spices,” far, far from it actually.

And then you've got the man behind the chopper in the back, bloody shirt, picking his teeth, waiting for you to tell him if you will have a pound of goat bones or cow ones, so he can make sure to cut out the meat from all your orders and in the process look down your shirt since you are probably not wearing a “proper attire”: a salwar kamiz with orna.

A lot of these shops have very short life spans, a year maybe at the most. Many have been shut down during the yearly health inspections, some of them for using the same blade to cut meat and fish, some for being a cockroach haven, and some for unknown, scarier reasons I dared not explore.

These stores will not change their ways anytime soon, they are doing great business. Bengalis from everywhere will keep them rich and business will flourish, the floor will be piled with dirt and the smell of garbage will constantly surround it, but that will not stop any Bengali from going in, it will of course keep anyone but a Bengali away from it these stores do not cater to any other customers but Bengalis, so why fix anything when no one is complaining.

Lately I have stopped going to the Bengali grocery stores as my local American grocery store added an international section and they are carrying turmeric to tamarind. I wonder how many more like me will also abandon the once necessary Bengali grocery stores, I wonder when the store owners of these great ideas but bad implementations will get the message, or at least smell it.


By the way

When doing your face make-up, keep it light. Skip foundation creams and use pressed powder instead. Skip eyeliner as you will sweat a lot and use mascara only. Use light lip-gloss or just line the lips with a liner instead.


 
 

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