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    Volume 10 |Issue 16 | April 22, 2011 |


   Inside

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 Film Review
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 Dhaka Diary
 Write to Mita
 Postscript

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Letters

Now or Never

It is needless to explain the condition of Bangladesh to all the readers owing to the fact Bangladesh is a country of rivers. The old Buriganga's condition is already a devastating one and most of the marine species have gone extinct and more are on the way to extinction with every passing day. Although the government and the people have taken steps to reduce pollution, the result has been negligible. The water that is supplied to all the houses comes from underground and already in many places the underground water level underground has gone down. Research shows that this is imposing the risk of a quake. Sadly enough, water uplifting cannot fulfill the requirement of city dwellers. So using the river water is a very good option. However an immense amount of pollution has made the river water unsuitable for drinking. I am therefore requesting everyone to unite and save the rivers by taking action against all those who are risking our lives. If nature releases its fury on us then no one can stand against it. Japan is the best example of that. It is time to think about nature and regulate our lives accordingly otherwise it will be too late to recover and it will not be a matter of surprise that people will have to struggle for pure and safe drinking water. So help nature and contribute in every possible way because our life is directly and indirectly dependent on it.

Hamim bin Hanif
Student of Glare Institute
Dhanmondi, Dhaka


Hindi Serial Addiction

It is generally known that most of the city housewives of the country are addicted to Indian TV serials. Different Indian channels are showcasing Hindi drama serials throughout the week. Most of the dramas are based on high society life. So, the characters are not different in each show. Indian Hindi drama quality is lower than our ones here in Bangladesh. We have a rich cultural heritage in drama serials as well as in films. Our drama is world class because of its variety, while Indian drama is common in characters and themes. There is nothing to learn from Indian dramas wherein housewives are portrayed in a demeaning manner with nothing to do but dress in fancy saris and jewellery and plot against people. Unfortunately most women in this country are watching these serials avidly and are refusing to watch Bangladeshi serials. We have some world-class actors and they are the pride of our nation. It is our moral duty to save our own culture and not to follow and promote others. So, housewives should avoid watching Hindi serials and make time to watch our Bangla serials. They may find that they have a lot more substance and actually enjoy them.

Mohammed Jashim Uddin
BSS, Dhaka


An Advertisement!

Advertisement is a promotional activity, which is done by marketers for introducing and promoting their products or services to the customers. Today marketers have to maintain many rules and regulations for doing business. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an essential part of these organisations. Performance of the organisations largely depends on whether the organisation is socially responsible. For doing business, another concept of societal marketing is also necessary. The societal marketing concept calls on marketers to fulfill the needs of the target audience in ways that improve society as a whole, while fulfilling the objectives of the organisation. Marketers also have to maintain ethics in their business and in their promotional activities. Some of the advertisements of perfumes are so inappropriate that it is really embarrassing to watch them with family members. But to keep pace with our neighbouring countries and with the greater extent of the satellite channels, these kinds of ads are also being produced in our country.

For many days now, the Bangladeshi media is telecasting an advertisement. The ad is about parachute oil. In this ad at first we see that an owner of a coconut oil factory in his dirty workplace where the oil is produced manually and in an unhygienic way. Then, a phone call comes from his wife, asking him to bring coconut oil home. The owner of the firm goes to a departmental store and buys parachute coconut oil. He then says, 'khola teler moto noy' (not like open dirty oil), parachute is always pure, because it is produced in a hyeigenic environment.

But the matter of concern about the ad is that, being an owner of an oil firm, why doesn't he use his firm's oil? As he is producing a commercial product, he must sell it to the public. But he indicates through the ad that his product is dirty and impure, and he sells it despite all that. It is easily understandable that, by selling this product he is deceiving customers. Is this an ethical ad? Is this what we want our kids to be watching and learning on TV? In a seminar study I proved this is the best example, that depicts the societal marketing concept. We say one thing, and do another. This ad is an example of that universal truth! Shouldn't our authorities look into this?

Ratan Adhikary Ratul
BBA, SUST, Sylhet


Emerging e-commerce in Bangladesh

E-commerce is the buying and selling of products and services by businesses and consumers over the Internet. Recently, e-commerce has become popular in Bangladesh. It creates new market, reduces transaction costs and saves time. A well-functioning e-commerce system also creates market for online security system, software, IT technician etc. We know it very well that science based job field is very small in our country. If e-commerce becomes popular, a good number of jobs will be created. At the same time proper rules and regulations must be formed to monitor and control e-commerce. We hope entrepreneurs will come forward to make e-commerce popular and successful.

Md Mosarraf Hossain
University of Dhaka


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