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Thursday, November 15, 2012
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Hay comes to Dhaka

Imagine the world at the 'Woodstock of the mind’

The Hay Festival Dhaka begins tonight for the second time at Bangla Academy. The extravaganza is open for all.

Some 100 eminent Bangladeshi and 30 international writers will be engaged here in 30 different panels for over two days exchanging ideas, sharing work and discussing the journey of world literature.

On the occasion, Bangla Academy will wear a festive look on November 16 and 17 weekend. Visitors will find themselves in a carnival atmosphere where writers, poets, lyricists and contributors to related forms of art will take the stage to share their experiences.

In 2001, the festival was described by Bill Clinton as “The woodstock of the mind”. Hay Festival has been a great platform for writers from around the world to be recognised internationally.

For 25 years, the Hay Festival of Literature & Arts has brought together creative minds from around the world to debate and share stories, and to launch new authors and books.

A handful of prominent publishing houses will be attending this year's festival specifically designed to maximize the exposure of Bangladeshi writers to the international audience.

The packed programme also packs a punch. There will be famous father-son duo Saidur Rahman Boyati and Abul Bashar Abbasi singing the traditional folk genre called Kobigaan. The charm will be no less when Shadhona Sangskritik Mondal takes the stage with their dance troupe and enchanting choreography.

The programmes include recitations by Shimul Mostofa and Dahlia Ahmed, among others; stage performances directed by Naila Azad Nupur; songs of Kazi Nazrul Islam; and poetry of Gillian Clarke, Arundhati Subramanium and Ruby Rahman. Also look out for rhymes inspired by Bangla folklore or Vikram Seth's novel in

verse.

There is even more: bilingual poetry slam, a look at poetry through the ages and bilingual story teller Shamim Azad, who combines all of the above to her unique performances.

The Hay Festival Dhaka wraps up with one of Tagore's musicals by Pallavi Dance Centre, and the soulful music of mystical bard Lalon Fakir sung by Arif Baul.

The details of the programme is available at hayfestivals.org/dhaka.

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Brilliant. Britain should stop India bias. There is much to be gained, from England, from having strong trustworthy relationship with Bangladesh both economic and cultural.

: Anonymous

 

 


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